Share With Your Friends:

Our Sponsor:


Image title


Maker of heating and cooling products specifically for your tiny house!


Here’s Macy’s website: http://minimotives.com


Beautiful pic of her tiny house:

Image title


Here’s a really long bio taken from Macy’s awesomely comprehensive site:


I am an artist, a thinker and a minimalist at heart… I love being out in the sunshine… I love animals of nearly every kind, at least the furry ones, I am trying to be a gardener… I believe people are good at the core but are also capable of very bad things when they aren’t intentional about their actions… I love my family, my passions and my life… I am just me 

My Story:

Since I was a tiny girl I always wanted to build my own place that had everything I wanted in it, nothing more nothing less. My own personal ‘fort’. In the house I grew up in there was a space on the side of the deck where my folks built a dog kennel. It was sort of tucked back and thus was a sweet little hiding spot. I used to go out and hang a hammock in the kennel and hang out with the dog all the time. It was my favorite place to be, partly I’m sure because our German Shepard spent time there too… he and I were BFF’s. The thing about it was that I could only hang out there when the weather was nice. So I started thinking that I wanted to build an enclosed fort there. I actually started saving money for it when I was around 5-6 years old. I remember pricing out plywood and knowing that it would take me a LONG time to save up enough.

I started drawing up plans hoping mom and dad would see how passionate about it I was and feel sorry for me and eventually give in and just buy it for me :). The thing is I wanted it to symbolize my favorite thing at that point in my life. No matter how hard I tried I couldn’t come up with a logical way to shape a plywood house into the shape of a dog… they were too tall, how would I enter without adding a really expensive elevator??

My next best animal was a rabbit, they were much easier to imagine converting to a fort for my small noggin. So I drew up plans for a rabbit shaped structure that would sit in the dog kennel area (approximately 8x15ish feet). I drew it up a hundred different ways and I remember my dad helping and thinking it was cool… at least encouraging me… it wasn’t cool enough to buy to him, but cool still.

That plan never worked out, I had to stay a resident at my folk’s place for another 10-12 years :), I was bummed!

I got pretty distracted from those plans by going to school but I always stayed passionate about building and design. I ended up going to school to be an architect. I am, right now in my internship period, I recently started taking my exams to get my license.  While studying I realized just how much I DON’T know. Not only in terms of what is on the exams but I don’t have a ton of ‘real world’ experience with a lot of the products and sciences I shamelessly promote. I want to build this tiny house in an effort to learn ACTUAL construction as well as to give me a baseline for understanding pros and cons for various building systems such as solar power, radiant heat, alternative sewage management etc. I want to document the construction process but also make a record of actual pros and cons of various systems as they function. In theory, I know a lot about these things, in reality I don’t. This is the main reason I am building this.

 

My Beliefs:

I very much believe that form follows function. Everything in a design should have a reason and a purpose. Good design can seamlessly integrate a plethora of systems and make it look natural. It can take various pieces and add them up to make a greater ‘whole’. I have no doubt there will be a lot of mistakes made from me on this house experiment but I will learn, that IS the ultimate point. In the mean time I get to not only learn about building, I get to learn about myself.

I will miss some things that I find lacking in my tiny house I’m sure (or maybe learn to appreciate them better) and I will realize some things I thought were ‘needs’ are really just wants. Either way I am going to strip my whole world back to what I consider the bare minimum for me to be happy. NOT the bare minimum for what I need to ‘exist’, there will be a lot of ‘excess’, but there are certain luxuries I don’t want to give up (like a shower with shoulder-room, a desk to work on, a chair for reading, an area to do my art work comfortably, etc.), these wants will be in my tiny house. There will be a lot that some deem as ‘needs’ that will not be though, like a spare bedroom, granite counters, a septic system to name a few. I want to prove to myself and to others that it is okay to challenge your own views of what you NEED and what you WANT.

Some say that this living situation won’t work for them, they have kids, or they ‘x’ or they ‘y’. And that may very well be true. But I want people to see that this is a valid direction to head, I may be more extreme about it than necessary but there will be lots of usable aspects for everyone to at least think about. The point overall about building environments is to have as little impact as possible on our ecosystem, in my opinion. Something that is a little closer to this WILL work for everyone. The thing about design is that it is fitting of the end user, or should be. You may not be able to build your home on the bed of a trailer and haul it into the woods at the end of its daily use to be used as a cabin but you CAN build a 600 s.f. house rather than a 2,600 s.f. house… You do not have to be this ‘extreme’ about re-evaluating your life but you CAN re-evaluate some things, you may be surprised at what you come up with, I have been.

Why Now:

Right now I am in a situation of paying someone else’s mortgage (rent), I hate that. There are actually LOTS of benefits to paying rent over a taking out a mortgage, I have learned that over the years. Certainly paying rent is better than buying a house you can’t afford, at high interest rates, low downs and long terms… I would MUCH rather rent than that but, I still hate renting.

There are also benefits in renting when you can ‘test’ out certain neighborhoods and see if you would actually like to put roots down there. You get to try out various layouts and figure out what you like best… I have enjoyed doing all of those things, I hate renting though, I don’t want to rent any longer.

Another, maybe lofty goal is to be able to travel around and learn how to build earth-ships in a couple years. It would be awesome to have a home I could take with me, off the grid and learn to take things to even the next step! That is a lofty dream, and I have a bit to cover first before going there… but still a partial reason I want to build my tiny home.

 

Why Tiny Works for Me:

*UPDATE*

During construction I met a boy (James), he loved the tiny house idea as much as me, he helped finish it up with me.  We’ve since been living tiny together in my tiny house for 6 months at this point (December 2013) with our great dane puppy.  Our daughter is due in March and we will be staying put in the tiny house.  This has allowed a perfect situation for us to live simply and for me to be able to raise my daughter instead of working so that I could provide her with day care.  We now have about a three/four year plan until I am guessing she will start needing some of her own space, that may happen sooner or later, I’m not sure.

*UPDATE 2*

Our next and last family member is on their way, we’ve been living tiny for 2 years and loving it (February 2015)!  Hazel is smart, ahead of the curve, I have been able to stay home and watch her/help her grow, a BIG priority for me.   James and I want two kids, preferably about 18 months apart like we are with our siblings, and we will have them, right about exactly when Hazel turns 1.5 we will be welcoming a new baby into the world.  We are planning a tiny house renovation/addition for this summer to help accommodate our growing family.  Our home will go from 196 s.f. to 232 s.f.

Tiny works with me because I like simple. I don’t have a ton of ‘stuff’, I don’t want a ton of ‘stuff’. I don’t have extended family or kids to shelter. I am single and don’t plan on starting a family for a couple years at least. I could afford to put visitors up in a hotel with the money I saved from not paying rent. My needs are simple. A simple house will be perfect for me.


Originally aired almost 3 years ago.


Download Podcast
(right click ⇒ save as)

Enjoy What You Hear?

Never miss an episode. Subscribe in your favorite app:

Continue Listening...

#155 Hydrogen Peroxide Takes the Blood Stains Out With Tiny House Builder Cameron Scott

#155 Hydrogen Peroxide Takes the Blood Stains Out With Tiny House Builder Cameron Scott

Cam has had a varied career path. Commercial pilot flying air ambulances, tending to elderly people, building tiny houses….building tiny houses? How did he go from life flight, to caretaker to tiny house builder? That’s what we wanted to know. We got our answers and in the process took a winding path through trials and tribulations of Oregon’s love-hate relationship with the tiny house movement. That’s right, one of the epicenters of the tiny house movement has essentially made making and selling the damn things nearly impossible in this state. And yet, Cam has hope this will all blow over, like a tumbleweed in the wash of a life flight helicopter.

Listen To Episode »

#154 I Got A Penis And I’m White With Michael Johnson

#154 I Got A Penis And I’m White With Michael Johnson

Holy smokes what an interview. Michael owns 121tinyhomes, a bend-based tiny house company that….well, we were going to write “builds tiny houses” but it seems he and his partner are thinking about other plans with tiny houses. Yes, they do provide customs and shells, workshops and all the other offerings many tiny house builders offer. But Michael comes at the industry with a unique twist. One we seriously appreciate. As for his penis and complexion….well you’re just going to have to listen in.

Listen To Episode »

#153 Getting Close And Personal With Tiny House Podcast Co-host Mark Grimes

#153 Getting Close And Personal With Tiny House Podcast Co-host Mark Grimes

decided to give interviewing each other a shot, so you get a sense of why the three of us came together in the first place. This is our first installment. And we’re not even sure it’s going to see the light of day. Fun fact: We actually recorded similar shows early on, but guess what? They haven’t seen the light of day either. I don’t even know why I’m writing this...chances are, you’re never going to read it.

Listen To Episode »

#152 A Surprising Ride Through Tiny House History With Michael Withy

#152 A Surprising Ride Through Tiny House History With Michael Withy

We were surprised this episode passed so quickly. Which is always a good sign. Michael Withy made a name for himself in the Occupy movement in Portland, Oregon during its heydays. Remarkably (to us) that notoriety would catapult him into his current line of work: conceptualizing affordable housing communities around the country. Fascinatingly enough, we never got to what Michael does because we were blown away by his stories about what he did. Don’t worry, it all ties together nicely to tiny houses. And as you can tell by the end of the show, we’re going to have to have Michael return to the studio for round two.

Listen To Episode »

#151 How To Survive And Thrive As a Tiny house builder with Jeremy Killian

#151 How To Survive And Thrive As a Tiny house builder with Jeremy Killian

We started this show with an joke that had unintentional macabre connections with reality. Once we recovered from that ghastly story, we were pleased to welcome Tiny Innovations principal Jeremy Killian who shared his secrets for succeeding in the Tiny House Movement as one of the preeminent builders. Jeremy should know a thing or two: he has over 200 builds in the works, both commercial and private individual clients seeking his builds, and an amazing business model that has put Tiny Innovations seemingly in the middle of it all that is Tiny...all without having to deal too much with zoning, planning, and many of the other challenges besieging other builders. It was almost as good as the conversation we had after the show. But since we didn’t record that, you’re just going to have to settle for what we did record. Snatch your hammer and beer and enjoy our latest episode.

Listen To Episode »

#150 Church Was Boring Until I Went To Jail With Linda Donaldson

#150 Church Was Boring Until I Went To Jail With Linda Donaldson

Tiny houses meets ex-offenders meets the housing crisis. Linda and her husband David, one day went from being entrepreneurs straight into debtor’s prison….literally. But this story ends up positive as the experience lead to David receiving “a calling” to serve those people they found themselves behind bars with. The result? Fresh Start Ventures, a new non profit organized to help ex-offenders avoid returning to prison. What’s really interesting about Fresh Start is they combine their mentoring work with housing...tiny house housing for ex offenders, through an innovative program that uses Tiny Houses as ADUs, community development and mentorship to create better and lasting opportunities for those coming out of prison.

Listen To Episode »

#149 Changes On The Road with Macy Miller And Family

#149 Changes On The Road with Macy Miller And Family

Who on earth goes from a tiny house in Idaho to a nationwide road trip in a tiny travel trailer? Uh, that would be Macy Miller! We caught up with her and her family on a nationwide national park junket to talk about their newest digs, which they rebuilt from the frame up, their road trip and one of the nicest jurisdiction violation conversations we’ve ever heard. Here’s what you get when you pair two architects, two kids, a great dane and a road trip with no definite end: a pack of stories to last a lifetime.

Listen To Episode »

#148 Trees Are My Speciality with Dustin Feider of O2Treehouse

#148 Trees Are My Speciality with Dustin Feider of O2Treehouse

Designer, treehouse builder, creator and fanboy of Buckminster Fuller, Dustin Feider takes advantage of nature’s oxygen-makers to create nothing short of art. Dustin’s designs typically riffs off the “bucky ball” aka the geodesic dome. Primarily his treehouse designs are enjoyed by Californians and range from $10,000 to more than six figures. So where did this passion for trees, oxygen and unusual, artistic structures originate? You’re going to have to listen to the show to find out. But bring a healthy dose of “give us some slack”: We somehow got super-high in this episode and we sometimes make no fucking sense whatsoever…..plus we have a new co-host. No we didn’t shit-can Michelle. How could we do that? http://www.o2treehouse.com

Listen To Episode »

#147 Lollipops and Polka Dots with BA Norrgard

#147 Lollipops and Polka Dots with BA Norrgard

Having BA Norrgard on Tiny House Podcast has been a long-anticipated event here at the studio. She and her new husband John graced us with their presence to talk about their story, how they got into the tiny house movement, what they see as the future of the movement and how they are plugging in to that movement in a way that will be personally profitable. From paralegal to tiny house luminary, BA has had many of her tiny dreams come true. We sat down with her to find out what the future holds for her. http://www.abedovermyhead.com

Listen To Episode »

#146 Teardrops On The Plains Of Africa With Aeroteardrop Trailers

#146 Teardrops On The Plains Of Africa With Aeroteardrop Trailers

Janice and Brian are intrepid entrepreneurs who met “in the worst workplace in the world”. That fateful encounter led the two not only into their relationship, but also into two successful organizations, one of which has introduced a brand new teardrop trailer to the car-camping market. Aeroteardrop trailers makes well-built, semi-customizable trailers with so many feature options, your head would spin. One option is a “car-roof tent” designed for the African Plains to keep lions from doing what they naturally do…..eat people. Janice and Brian joined us in-studio to share their story, how they got to where they are and what’s next for this intrepid entrepreneurial couple. Take a listen! http://aeroteardrops.com

Listen To Episode »

#145 Quality Builds Bless The Rains In Africa with Jeremy Weaver

#145 Quality Builds Bless The Rains In Africa with Jeremy Weaver

Jeremy Weaver from Wind River Tiny Homes quit medical school years ago to pursue a masters degree that emphasized entrepreneurialism. Thus Wind River was born! And now, he’s about to move on from Wind River to pursue other, even more wonderful adventures, including living in a farmhouse he built himself, popping out another baby and, possibly traveling to Africa to do some really fantastic things. But before that, Jeremy joined us on the show to update us on Wind River builds, customers, quality and his own personal journey as an owner of one of the premier tiny house builder companies in the United States. http://www.windrivertinyhomes.com

Listen To Episode »

#144 Michelle Surprises The Crew With Our Sound Engineer’s Tiny House Journey Rick McNerney

#144 Michelle Surprises The Crew With Our Sound Engineer’s Tiny House Journey Rick McNerney

What a lovely surprise. Our volunteer sound engineer Rick McNerney joined us on the show today. By now you probably know our show is so much better with Rick’s assistance (thanks Rick). What you may not know is we met Rick at a tiny house festival, that we hit it off instantly and, that Rick and his wife are nearly-complete co-building an epic tiny house. We’re still scratching our heads at how this creative guy, with so many hobbies and a 60-hour-a-week job manages to have time to make us sound so good each week. We’re also still scratching our heads about how great this episode was. It was like a chat among friends over beers. Take a listen.

Listen To Episode »

#143 When the Code is Subjective, Enforcement is Elective. And That’s Not Fair with Luke Iseman

#143 When the Code is Subjective, Enforcement is Elective. And That’s Not Fair with Luke Iseman

Luke Iseman is one of those people who when he hears “no” he says “hold my beer”. After an appalling realization he and his partner was spending an ENORMOUS amount of their take-home on rent in the Bay Area, Luke got creative. He found a vacant lot he eventually bought, and put a container home on it. Not long after, he had a small colony of intrepid, super-smart, artsy tech people who joined him. Together they thumbed their noses at the area’s stratospheric cost of living….until the city got involved….

That was almost three years ago. Today, Luke has beat the city and is building an impressive business that not only put a (tiny) roof over his head, but also others seeking relief from some of the highest housing costs in the United States. https://boxouse.com

Listen To Episode »

#142 Log Cabin Everywhere….”I don’t ask for nuthin” with Doug and Stacy

#142 Log Cabin Everywhere….”I don’t ask for nuthin” with Doug and Stacy

Today we’re doing more off gridding with a heaping dose of authenticity (and facial hair) with Doug from the YouTuber duo “Off Grid with Doug and Stacy”. Omagosh what a show. Doug opened his 600 square foot cabin to us, a cabin he and his wife built all their own, after living as city slickers most of their lives. Having been successful entrepreneurs then getting sick and tired of being sick and tired, they deliberately bought a bunch of land in a zoning and planning district where “we don’t have any of that (planning and zoning) NONSENSE up here” and build their own tiny oasis. It’s complete with all the creatures you might want for feed stock, rain catchment, heat, comfort and...get this NO ELECTRICITY (in the traditional sense). It’s a show worth listening to twice! Sit back and tune in. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChit3QKk051fCsqliwVrbuQ

Listen To Episode »

141 Changing Lives, One Teardrop Trailer at a Time with Andrew Bennett

141 Changing Lives, One Teardrop Trailer at a Time with Andrew Bennett

Andrew Bennett is a craftsman through and through, having roots literally back to the Mayflower. You could almost say he’s kin with Jesus too. Because of the way he lives his life, how he gives unflinchingly to others, and, though he doesn’t like washing feet, he believes things most of us have given up on. “Your best return on investment is through people”: a golden nugget from this master builder who went from remodelling vintage homes to today building teardrop and Shepherd wagons for the tiny traveling nomad. With a crew of three veterans, a wife who uncshools his two kids and his mad skills, Andrew has carved out quite a comfortable little niche for his family, a niche he strongly recommends we all consider as a way of making humanity better than it was when you got here. Check out this week’s podcast. But be prepared to have your life changed. http://trekkertrailers.com

Listen To Episode »

#140 When Good Intentions Meet Good Intentions….From the Other Direction with David Wade

#140 When Good Intentions Meet Good Intentions….From the Other Direction with David Wade

Ahem. We’re still scratching our heads on this show. We’re still wondering how we ended up pulling this one off. Maybe it’s because land use planning and zoning is so endemic to success of tiny houses that, no matter what community you’re talking about, you’re going to come up with interesting subject matter. In this episode we chat with ADU consultant David Wade. He plies his trade in Eugene, Oregon helping local ADU and Tiny House advocates navigate quagmire-like hoops making up Eugene’s land use regulations. David gives tips for other communities doing the same, suggesting that organizing and being vocal are critical to grass roots success. So is knowing who you’re up against: for sometimes, your neighbor may be your worst enemy.

Listen To Episode »

#139 We’re Way Off the Reservation with Diane Freaney and Emerson Street House

#139 We’re Way Off the Reservation with Diane Freaney and Emerson Street House

What is Emerson Street House? Well we never really found out because our interview with intrepid Diane Freeney, Wall Street banker turned community advocate, roamed so far from housing and tiny houses, even we lost our way. It was a great conversation nonetheless, ranging from praising President Donald Trump, lambasting the construction trade, solving education in the US, building communities, and most interestingly: how not to build a passive solar home. Join us for one of the wildest conversations we’ve had in a l-o-n-g time. Even we were surprised. It’s a wild and woolly walkabout through what lights Diane’s fire on this episode of Tiny House Podcast! https://emersonstreethouse.com

Listen To Episode »

#138 Super-Technical Talk on Tiny House Builds with Kamtz Tiny Houses’ Luke Kamtz

#138 Super-Technical Talk on Tiny House Builds with Kamtz Tiny Houses’ Luke Kamtz

Luke Kamtz is a bold individual. In 2017 he hung out his (tiny) shingle as the latest tiny house builder, dubbing his company “Kamtz Tiny Houses.” Luke’s courage doesn’t end there, he also believes he can do what few have figured out: make money while building custom tiny houses. Like a little Aussie shrimp, we put Luke on the barbie for a bit and grilled him about why he thinks he can do what few have succeeded in doing. We talked differentiation, construction lessons learned, his first demonstration tiny which has received its share of recognition and reward. Then the conversation turned to the big (tiny) bottleneck: land use planning and zoning. It’s the tiny tech talk episode. http://kamtztinyhomes.com

Listen To Episode »

#137 Sprouting Tiny Communities 200 Houses At A Time with Sprout Tiny Homes

#137 Sprouting Tiny Communities 200 Houses At A Time with Sprout Tiny Homes

If there is one company that has the greatest potential of unseating Tumbleweed as the largest, best known company in the tiny house community, it’s tiny house developer Sprout Tiny Homes. Nearly from the get-go, Sprout set their sights not only on the one-home-sale retail market, but also on the larger opportunity represented by full-blown tiny house developments. As a result, they are in the process of developing 200 unit communities, complete with planned community designs promising to significantly increase live-ability and desirability. Alan Kirchhoff, Sprout representative shares both Sprout and his own perspective on living tiny, how tiny homes for the homeless are affecting tiny house reputations, and of course, codes, zoning laws and the economics of building 200 homes at a time. http://sprouttinyhomes.com

Listen To Episode »

 Getting Squared With A New Tiny Builder with Scott Wilson

Getting Squared With A New Tiny Builder with Scott Wilson

Super-green and sustainable builder Zerosquared is one of the newest tiny house builders. Their first product, the Aurora, caused a stir with two bump-outs, SIP construction and other energy-efficient designs. We talked with Zerosquared principal Scott Wilson and his journey into the tiny house community, including an 18-month stint he and his wife spent traveling the US in a towable RV. Scott explained his company’s build philosophy, their unique, award-winning design and how they see their product design fitting nicely between the DIY-er desiring the ultimate in a tiny house and the more mass-market consumer who may not want to build their own tiny, but still wants to take advantage of opportunities going tiny allows. Take a listen.

Listen To Episode »

#135 Navigating to Nowhere? – with Michael Fuehrer

#135 Navigating to Nowhere? – with Michael Fuehrer

#135 Navigating to Nowhere? – with Michael Fuehrer
Our guest this week proves that you don’t have to be an interior designer to live in a lovely, comfortable, and impressive space on wheels. While attending tiny house events in Washington, Texas, and Florida; Michelle noticed an increasing number of Schoolies joining the party! And, known to go where the party is, Michelle met our guest this week and was immediately comfortable in his space; a renovated school bus. What tiny houses lack in mobility, busses more than make up for! Imagine. Just get in the driver’s seat and GO! What are the unique challenges of driving and parking these funky houses on wheels? What motivated Michael to renovate a bus, instead of an RV? How easy, or hard, are they to drive and heat and occupy? And, what do his parents think? This professor on wheels has a lot to teach us so sit down, be quiet, and take notes. There WILL be a quiz!!
www.navigationnowhere.com

Listen To Episode »

#134 How Far Can you Go For FREE? – with Derek and Amy Cobia

#134 How Far Can you Go For FREE? – with Derek and Amy Cobia

What IS a tiny house? Don’t worry, we won’t be arguing the fine points of this concept this week. We will, however, once again be happily welcoming a simple living, tiny space occupying, couple to chat with us about overcoming the challenges of living small and on the road full time. Intrigued? Our guests this week have some really GREAT ideas about how you can too! If not right now, make a plan to listen in later and be sure to check them out on Instagram so you can keep up with where they’re off to next.
www.instagram.com/TheFrugalRVer

Listen To Episode »

#133 Into the Great and Tiny Beyond – with Leanne Stephens
#132 Tiny Houses In The “Other” West – with Renee Randau McLaughlin